A BasketBall-Player-Sized Asteroid

The title of the Article is, “A Basketball-Player-Sized Asteroid, By Camille M. Carlisle.” The date when the article posted December 5, 2016. The source is,“Sky & Telescope: The Essential Guide to Astronomy.” The other scientists who’re involved in this are Vishnu Reddy and his colleagues from the University of Arizona.

Near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) are the social members of the asteroid population. Currently, there are more than 15,000 NEAs, 2,000-plus of which are less than 30 meters wide.

Scientists are doing their best to build up our inventory of NEAs, not only for the sake of planetary defense but also for scientific curiosity because asteroids are the crumbs left over from planetary formation.
Spectrally, it looks like a rare type of meteorite called an aubrite. Aubrites contain bright minerals, mostly silicates, formed in an oxygen-free environment hot enough to melt rock. The team determined that 2015 TC25 reflects about 60% of the light that shines on it, thanks to information given to them.

Given its magnitude, this albedo means that 2015 TC25 is also slight; the team estimates the NEA is 2 meters across, or about the size of a professional basketball player. That makes it one of the smallest asteroids studied. There are a total 40 NEAs that are dimmer than 2015 TC25, but without knowing how reflective those rocks are, we can’t say whether they’re bigger or smaller, Reddy explains.

2015 TC25 is also one of the fastest rotators for its size. This speed, plus the little girth, likely explains why 2015 TC25 seems to be dust-free a very unusual state of affairs for an asteroid, which often covering with the stuff. The little NEA is unable to hold onto any debris.

The reason why I’ve chosen this article, because of people who are interested in Asteroids.

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